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CPS: Medium: Collaborative Research: Active Shooter Tracking & Evacuation Routing for Survival (ASTERS): University of Tennessee Knoxville

Subhadeep Chakraborty

[email protected]

Most preK-12 school districts in the United States dedicate significant resources to safeguard against active shooters, e.g., school hardening, community planning, identification of suspicious behavior, crisis training for law enforcement, and training exercises for students, teachers, and all school personnel. However, when such an active-shooting event is in progress, only vague guidance is available to students and school personnel in the form of directives such as the "run-hide-fight" protocol. The Active Shooter Tracking and Evacuation Routing for Survival (ASTERS) project will complement these efforts by tracking a shooter in real time across multiple cameras and microphones, calculate the optimum evacuation path to safety for each student, teacher, and staff member, and communicate this information through a mobile app interface that is co-created in partnership with a connected community of students, parents, educators and administrators as well as school resource officers and school safety officers. ASTERS will incorporate multi-modal sensing, machine learning and signal processing techniques to accurately localize a gunman and weapons while preserving privacy of school community members. It will also use new computer vision and high-performance computing solutions to estimate crowd density and movement of people, and novel optimization and real-time simulation algorithms to predict ideal evacuation routes based on the building layout and predicted movement of the shooter. ASTERS will collaborate with schools to develop an annotated, multi-modal active shooter data set using a combination of digital simulation data and real-life practice drills. The research team will also partner with first-responders to ensure that ASTERS aligns with their needs. <br/><br/>Providing customized and actionable commands to each group of civilians through a mobile app will potentially vastly improve chances of safe evacuation. Messages will provide clear actionable information and suggestions, such as "Shooter is leaving the cafeteria heading to the gym. Your best exit is out the Main Entrance", rather than leave it up to individuals' panicked judgement. Moreover, ASTERS will enable automated and instantaneous reporting of location and physical attributes of shooter and type of weapons being used, to a 911 call center. This will provide responding patrol officers with critical strategic information for planning a tactical offensive and alleviate, if not overcome, the dependence on unreliable eye-witness accounts. Data from previous mass shootings demonstrate the important of providing people accurate information and guidance about evacuation. The ASTERS project will enable the realization of smart safety systems that integrate sensors, communication, algorithms, and human factors research to provide life-saving information to vulnerable people.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

CS4SA-HS: Developing a collaborative of secondary computer science teachers to increase Latinx participation in CS: University of Texas at San Antonio

Timothy Yuen

[email protected]

The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and teachers and administrators in the San Antonio Independent School District (SAISD) — a district with a majority Latinx student population — propose a researcher-practitioner partnership (RPP), CS4SA-HS. The project will design and implement a rigorous teacher professional development (PD) program to develop a qualified high school computer science (CS) teacher workforce in Texas. It will target non-CS high school teachers and prepare them to become highly qualified CS teachers of linguistically and culturally diverse learner populations. Overall, CS4SA-HS aims to increase Latinx participation in CS by building a collaborative of secondary teachers who are prepared to teach CS in their diverse classrooms, become advocates for and leaders of CS education in their districts, and contribute to broadening participation in CS and other STEM areas. <br/><br/>Its specific aims are to: <br/><br/>(1) Create and deliver a teacher PD program that emphasizes building foundational CS knowledge and skills and adopting culturally responsive approaches to CS teaching; <br/>(2) Increase CS learning opportunities in school communities of large Latinx populations; <br/>(3) Establish a CS Pathway curriculum that meets the needs of communities with large Latinx populations; <br/>(4) Create sustainable and scalable CS PD opportunities within and across schools through teacher leadership; and <br/>(5) Advance the knowledge and research in CS teacher education, culturally responsive CS education, and teacher professional development. <br/><br/>There are two main research questions: (i) In what ways can PD prepare secondary teachers from non-CS backgrounds to successfully teach CS in their culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms? (ii) Does culturally responsive CS teaching lead to increasing participation of Latinx students in CS? The project will increase our understanding of effective high school CS education for minority learner populations, providing best practices with respect to high school CS teacher PD and its impact on increasing Latinx participation in CS.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Investigating Effective STEM Teaching Through a Culturally Responsive Lens: American Museum Natural History

Elaine Howes

[email protected]

This project aims to serve the national need to understand the effectiveness of STEM teachers at high-need schools. Specifically, the project will analyze how culturally responsive science teaching is conducted in high-need school settings and how teacher preparation programs affect the real-world implementation of culturally responsive teaching practices. This study has the potential to increase understanding of how particular components of teacher preparation can promote teacher effectiveness in high-need schools. Thus, the results could be used to advance the goal of providing all students with qualified and effective STEM teachers.<br/><br/>This project at the American Museum of Natural History includes partnerships with the State University of New York College at Cortland and Virginia Commonwealth University. All three partners have received Noyce funding. The project will use case studies to examine the ways in which culturally responsive pedagogy is incorporated into the respective Noyce programs and manifests itself in the teaching practices of program graduates. The project will construct two sets of case studies, the first of which will depict specific components of each partner?s Noyce program. The second set of case studies will detail the teaching practices of each Noyce programs? graduates. The case studies will draw on the perspectives of multiple stakeholders (e.g., program graduates; their students, administrators, program faculty, and leadership; and school-based mentor teachers), and the project will conduct analyses across each set of studies. Due to the partners' diverse geographical locations, the study will attend to culturally responsive science teaching in high-need settings in both rural and urban areas. Throughout the project, two Noyce Scholar graduates from each partner institution will join the Research Team as co-researchers and contribute to all research efforts and case study development. Thus, teachers and teacher educators will work collaboratively to develop a cohesive understanding of how culturally responsive science teaching can be practiced in different classroom contexts, along with the role that program experiences may play in the development of Noyce graduates? effectiveness. The major outcomes of this study will be rich descriptive case studies and analyses of Noyce graduates? teaching practices in the light of culturally responsive science teaching as it relates to teacher effectiveness, along with characterizations of how these practices are reflective (or not) of graduates? preparation experiences. Findings will be shared with the Noyce community as part of the project?s dissemination efforts to support Noyce programs as they develop plans for enhancing teacher effectiveness in high-need schools. These findings are designed to deepen the understanding of effective practice, including what it can look like and what preparation programs can do to support their teachers in learning how to implement it in flexible and context-dependent ways. Furthermore, findings from this study will be made available to researchers across the field, enabling them to draw from complex and nuanced understandings of teachers' practice and connections to teacher preparation, filling a current need in the field. Building on these findings will strengthen studies to further illuminate the connections among teacher effectiveness, persistence, and retention in high-need settings. This Track 4: Noyce Research project is supported through the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program (Noyce). The Noyce program supports talented STEM undergraduate majors and professionals to become effective K-12 STEM teachers and experienced, exemplary K-12 STEM teachers to become STEM master teachers in high-need school districts. It also supports research on the persistence, retention, and effectiveness of K-12 STEM teachers in high-need school districts.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

PFI-TT: Novel mobile platform technology to both prevent and respond to teen dating violence: University of New Hampshire

Sharyn Potter

[email protected]

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Partnerships for Innovation – Technology Translation (PFI-TT) PFI project is to develop a smartphone app/platform technology to prevent and respond to dating violence incidences, a significant public health problem affecting over 35% of high school students with long-term health, social and economic consequences. Despite the magnitude of this problem, 68% of high school principals reported lacking formal training on how to assist teen dating violence victims. The proposed technology offers an economically viable dating violence prevention strategy for high schools. The existing mobile apps are not designed for high school students to assist themselves (or a friend) who is a victim of teen dating violence and do not have a have a simple mechanism enabling high school administrators to coordinate and customize the prevention and response messaging their students are accessing. If successful, the proposed technology will fill a gap not addressed by currently available solutions, which are not designed to help the students enrolled in the 35,163 US high schools discretely extricate themselves from situations with the potential to become dangerous. <br/><br/>The proposed project will consist of three elements that, combined, represent a highly innovative technology solution to a prevalent public health problem. First is the use of existing smartphone capabilities in new ways (e.g., enabling users to appear to receive urgent texts or phone calls, which are, in reality, simulated, to provide a socially sensitive reason for a student to leave a risky situation). Second is the application of extensive evidence-based research to both prevention and response technology features within the app. Third is a simple-to-use dashboard, through which high school administrators can easily customize data in the back-end database, to make it specific to their students and institution, and monitor its use among their students.<br/>The specific feature requirements needed for this interactive mobile platform will be informed by institutional review board (IRB)-reviewed interviews, focus groups and online surveys with students, parents/guardians and school administrators. The proposed hybrid smartphone app will run on Apple iOS and Android operating systems, using Google's Firebase SDK for analytics and accessing data from a back-end SQL database. The app platform will include a simple-to-use dashboard interface to the database, enabling schools to easily customize content to adapt to school and state policies and to monitor anonymous statistics about app use within their institution.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Collaborative Research: RAPID: Mitigating the Impact of Forced Remote Learning of ECS Due to COVID-19: Chicago Public Schools

Andrew Rasmussen

[email protected]

The Learning Partnership, in collaboration with the Chicago Public Schools (CPS), and Education Development Center (EDC), will conduct research and develop teacher support programs that will mitigate the impact that the global COVID pandemic is having on high school computer science students in CPS. There are significant concerns that the variability in implementation of remote learning policies in response to COVID-19 school closures could exacerbate educational inequities in access and quality of experience for students taking Exploring Computer Science (ECS). These concerns are particularly acute in CPS where computer science is a graduation requirement and ECS is the primary course that students take to fulfill the requirement. Inequalities in access and implementation of computer science in CPS can have consequences for students? high school graduation. In order to develop effective teaching materials for the 2020-2021 academic year, the project team will study the overall impact of remote learning by comparing outcomes for the 2019-20 implementation of ECS in CPS relative to the previous three years of ECS implementation as well as whether inequities have emerged within CPS by examining differences in school plans for remote learning, student access to technology, participation in remote learning experiences by race and ethnicity and whether those differences correlate with differences in learning outcomes. <br/><br/>This project extends the work of the Chicago Alliance for Equity in Computer Science (CAFECS), a long-standing partnership between university computer science faculty, educational researchers, and CPS teachers and administrators, to ensure that all CPS high school students engage in high quality, engaging computer science education. CAFECS will develop strategies develop strategies on how to emulate effective high-touch teacher facilitation strategies online from their experience with face-to-face classrooms. The project will be guided by three research questions: (1) How can we design online professional development to support ECS teachers? transition to teach the course fully or partially online during the 2020-21 school year? (2) How can the CAFÉCS coaching model be adapted to support teachers in moving ECS to a remote learning format and to provide remote coaching when school access is restricted? (3) What are the characteristics of remote learning policies that foster student engagement and best support student online collaboration? The teacher professional development model will be guided by the Desimone and Garet framework to provide a structure for drawing conclusions about the contribution of the professional development in mitigating the impact COVID-19 school building closures have on student outcomes. The results of this research will have a direct impact on hundreds of CPS teachers and, ultimately, thousands of CPS high school students. The results will significantly contribute to the knowledge base of how to effectively teach computer science for underserved students in computer science and how schools can mitigate the impacts of COVID-19.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Modeling Secondary School STEM Teacher Retention via Ecological Theories: University of Connecticut

John Settlage

[email protected]

This project aims to serve the national need to increase the persistence of science and mathematics teachers in teaching careers, particularly in schools designated as high need. A distinctive feature of this project is its application of ecological theory to examine why science or math teachers in the state of Connecticut decide to remain in or to leave their teaching position. The project will also use innovative statistical analyses to identify factors from the individual classroom to the entire school system that affect the teachers? decisions. The research will be based on data from local, state, and federal educational agencies, together with qualitative information collected within specific settings. This research has the potential to improve understandings and explanations of STEM teacher retention and loss. In addition, the statistical modeling approaches and associated analyses could be transferable for similar investigations in other settings.<br/><br/>This research project at University of Connecticut has three goals. First, the project is designed to produce quantitative analyses that may result in an empirically informed typology of secondary schools. This goal will result in a more nuanced mechanism for categorizing schools than simply relying on the percentage of low-income students to classify a school as high-need or not. Second, the project aims to identify factors at the classroom, department, and/or school level that are associated with science and math teacher attrition. More detailed and multi-level explanations could enable educational leaders to make more informed choices about strategies for retaining STEM teachers. The final research goal is to assess whether a congruence in views about educational equity between school administrators and STEM teachers is associated with retention and attrition. In addition to statistical modeling and analytic processes arising from this research, the project will communicate findings to school leaders and district administrators to inform their efforts to enhance STEM teacher retention. Consequently, this research project has the potential to provide recommendations that could enhance opportunities for high-quality STEM instruction. This Track 4: Noyce Research project is supported through the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program (Noyce). The Noyce program supports talented STEM undergraduate majors and professionals to become effective K-12 STEM teachers and experienced, exemplary K-12 STEM teachers to become STEM master teachers in high-need school districts. It also supports research on the persistence, retention, and effectiveness of K-12 STEM teachers in high-need school districts.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

RAPID Collaborative Research: Mitigating the Impact of Forced Remote Learning of ECS Due to COVID-19: The Learning Partnership

Steven McGee

[email protected]

The Learning Partnership, in collaboration with the Chicago Public Schools (CPS), and Education Development Center (EDC), will conduct research and develop teacher support programs that will mitigate the impact that the global COVID pandemic is having on high school computer science students in CPS. There are significant concerns that the variability in implementation of remote learning policies in response to COVID-19 school closures could exacerbate educational inequities in access and quality of experience for students taking Exploring Computer Science (ECS). These concerns are particularly acute in CPS where computer science is a graduation requirement and ECS is the primary course that students take to fulfill the requirement. Inequalities in access and implementation of computer science in CPS can have consequences for students? high school graduation. In order to develop effective teaching materials for the 2020-2021 academic year, the project team will study the overall impact of remote learning by comparing outcomes for the 2019-20 implementation of ECS in CPS relative to the previous three years of ECS implementation as well as whether inequities have emerged within CPS by examining differences in school plans for remote learning, student access to technology, participation in remote learning experiences by race and ethnicity and whether those differences correlate with differences in learning outcomes. <br/><br/>This project extends the work of the Chicago Alliance for Equity in Computer Science (CAFECS), a long-standing partnership between university computer science faculty, educational researchers, and CPS teachers and administrators, to ensure that all CPS high school students engage in high quality, engaging computer science education. CAFECS will develop strategies develop strategies on how to emulate effective high-touch teacher facilitation strategies online from their experience with face-to-face classrooms. The project will be guided by three research questions: (1) How can we design online professional development to support ECS teachers? transition to teach the course fully or partially online during the 2020-21 school year? (2) How can the CAFÉCS coaching model be adapted to support teachers in moving ECS to a remote learning format and to provide remote coaching when school access is restricted? (3) What are the characteristics of remote learning policies that foster student engagement and best support student online collaboration? The teacher professional development model will be guided by the Desimone and Garet framework to provide a structure for drawing conclusions about the contribution of the professional development in mitigating the impact COVID-19 school building closures have on student outcomes. The results of this research will have a direct impact on hundreds of CPS teachers and, ultimately, thousands of CPS high school students. The results will significantly contribute to the knowledge base of how to effectively teach computer science for underserved students in computer science and how schools can mitigate the impacts of COVID-19.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

CSforAll: Making CT: Integrating Computational Thinking into Elementary Classrooms: Citadel Military College of South Carolina

Jennifer Albert

[email protected]

The goal of this project is to develop and investigate a model to support P-5 teachers in implementing interdisciplinary, computational thinking-integrated lessons. The strategy is to employ a model of professional development that was previously developed to support elementary teachers to integrate computational thinking into their teaching of school subjects. This study turns attention to the systemic support for broadening and sustaining this integration of computational thinking through development of a research practice partnership between the Citadel and Charleston Progressive Academy, an elementary school serving a historically marginalized urban community. The study analyzes how teachers develop expertise in integrating computational thinking activities and how the broader school system provides supports for realizing and sustaining this development. Ultimately, the findings serve as a foundation for design of scalable elementary teacher professional development and ongoing support for computational thinking integration.<br/><br/>Over the two years of the project, at least 10 teachers will engage in reflective PD sessions held throughout the academic year and summer. In these, teachers will explore, co-design, and implement activities that integrate computational thinking into their existing content area standards and curricula. The computational thinking activities, which will include standards-based lesson plans and resources, offer both plugged and unplugged components, so that students and teachers have opportunities to understand the conceptual underpinnings of computational thinking with and without computers. Surrounding this effort is support from a broader set of stakeholders, including researchers and school administrators, that facilitate the project's efforts and provide formative feedback. Over the two years of this study, cycles of design and analysis are used to refine conjectures for the design of computational thinking lessons and related teacher professional development from this broader community's perspective. The study provides a set of empirically-tested design conjectures from which others can develop computational thinking lessons and professional development specifically tailored to other state, district, or school contexts. Research on this project is studying the trajectories of teacher learning, as they increase their ability to integrate computational thinking into their teaching of school subjects. In addition, analyses include investigations of the research-practice partnership itself, focusing on how this partnership works with school-based stakeholders to best support teachers toward its goals. This project is funded by the CS for All program.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Supporting Computer Science in Rural Schools: CodeVA

Bryan Wallace

[email protected]

Strengthening computer science (CS) and computational thinking (CT) education is a national priority with particular attention to increasing the number of teachers prepared to deliver computer science courses. For rural schools, that collectively serve more than 10 million students, it is especially challenging. Rural schools find it difficult to recruit and retain STEM teachers that are prepared to teach computer science and computational thinking. This project will develop, test, and refine a "train-the-trainer" professional development model for rural teacher-leaders. The project will build teachers' self-efficacy to deliver computer science concepts and practices into middle school social studies classrooms. The project is led by CodeVA (a statewide non-profit in Virginia), in partnership with TERC (a STEM-focused national research institution) and the University of South Florida College of Education, and in collaboration with six rural school districts in Virginia. The project goal is to design and develop a professional development model that supports teachers integrating culturally relevant computer science skills and practices into their middle school social studies classrooms, thereby broadening rural students' participation in computer science. The professional development model will be designed and developed around meeting rural teachers, where they are, geographically, economically, and culturally. The model will also be sustainable and will work within the resource constraints of the rural school district. The model will also be built on strategies that will broadly spread CS education while building rural capacity. <br/><br/>The project will use a mixed-methods research approach to understand the model's potential to build capacity for teaching CS in rural schools. The research design is broken down into four distinct phases; planning/development prototyping, piloting and initial dissemination, an efficacy study, and analysis, and dissemination. The project will recruit 45 teacher-leaders and one district-level instructional coach, 6th and 7th-grade teachers, and serve over 1900 6th and 7th-grade students. Participants will be recruited from the rural Virginia school districts of Buchanan, Russell, Charlotte, Halifax, and Northampton. The research question for phase 1 is what is each district's existing practice around computer science education (if any) and social studies education? Phases 2, 3 and 4 research will examine the effectiveness of professional development on teacher leadership and the CS curricular integration. Phase 4 research will examine teacher efficacy to implement the professional development independently, enabling district teachers to integrate CS into their social studies classes. Teacher data sources for each phase include interviews with administrators and teachers, teacher readiness surveys, observations, an examination of artifacts, and CS/CT content interviews. Student data will consist of classroom observation and student attitude surveys. Quantitative and qualitative data will be triangulated to address each set of research questions and provide a reliability check on findings. Qualitative data, such as observations/video, and interview data will be analyzed through codes that represent expected themes and patterns related to teachers? and coaches? experiences. Project results will be communicated through presentations at conferences such as Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education, the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA), the National Council for Social Studies (NCSS), and the American Educational Research Association. Lesson plans will be made available on the project website, and links will be provided through publications and newsletters such as the NCSS Middle-Level Learner, NCSS Social Education, CSTA the Voice, the NSF-funded CADREK12 website and the NSF-funded STEM Video Showcase. <br/><br/>The Discovery Research preK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of innovative resources, models and tools. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Building Capacity for Educational Assessment Research in Geography: Texas State University – San Marcos

Michael Solem

[email protected]

This project will allow a mid-career principal investigator to acquire education research expertise needed to successfully conceive and execute fundamental research with the potential to meaningfully advance knowledge about psychometrics and large-scale data analysis as it relates to geography assessment. The principal investigator's individual professional development plan includes a mentor and advisory board members with expertise specific to this topic who will provide guidance and feedback throughout the award period. Specifically, the principal investigator will seek to increase capacity in the following areas: (1) large scale data operation; (2) defining and measuring geography constructs; (3) issues of sampling and population modeling; (4) item response theory; (5) statistical methodologies for analyzing clustered assessment datasets; (6) specialized software packages for analyzing data; (7) hierarchical linear modeling; and (8) cognitive diagnostic modeling relative to achievement testing. Activities in the professional development plan needed to gain required expertise to complete the pilot study will be obtained through subject-specific conferences, workshops, short courses, seminars, webinars, mentoring and networking. <br/><br/>Guided by the psychometric measurement theory, the principal investigator will analyze geography data collected through the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) recent administrations to explain patterns of geographic learning among youth in diverse school communities. This analysis is important since NAEP data show that students from minority populations continue to score at or below basic in geography. Hence, the principal investigator will examine variability in geography achievement for all grade levels on which data are available relative to student background characteristics, school-level contextual attributes, and classroom opportunity to learn. Survey data from teachers and school administrators who participated in NAEP administrations will also be analyzed. Through this project, the principal investigator will gain expertise needed to plan, design, and conduct studies on educational assessment and measurement in the context of geography education and set the stage for future interventions to enable more minority students to achieve at higher levels in geography. The project is supported through the EHR Core Research Building Capacity in STEM Education Research competition that is designed to build individuals' capacity to carry out high quality fundamental STEM education research in STEM learning and learning environments, broadening participation in STEM fields, and STEM workforce development.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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