Category

School Administrators Research

Home / School Administrators Research
AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Collaborative Research: Engineering the Chemistry at Solid-Solid Interfaces of Li-O2 Battery Cathodes: Purdue University

Jeffrey Greeley

[email protected]

Lithium-oxygen batteries potentially could have energy storage capacities that rival gasoline fuel, but there remains much fundamental scientific knowledge to learn about these batteries before the technology can be commercialized. In particular, some of the chemical products formed during the operation of the batteries can slowly degrade and poison the materials, leading to performance losses over extended periods of operation. This research project seeks to overcome these problems by exploring a class of inexpensive, mixed metal oxide electrocatalysts that may alter the chemistry of lithium-oxygen batteries. This project aims to develop a framework to engineer the chemistry of lithium-oxygen batteries, which are a potential next-generation energy storage device, and to improve their performance. The studies combine advanced characterization methods and theoretical calculations to determine how the properties of the oxide surfaces influence the products that are produced on lithium-oxygen electrodes. These insights will be leveraged to develop design principles that will aide in identifying oxide electrocatalysts that improve battery cell performance. The researchers involved in this project will partner with local K-12 schools to involve economically disadvantaged students with the proposed research through summer internships and student exchanges. They aim to inspire the students to pursue careers in science and engineering. <br/><br/>A fundamental understanding of the reactions occurring at solid-solid interfaces is critical for the development of next-generation energy storage devices, such as lithium-oxygen batteries. Lithium-oxygen batteries have attracted significant interest in recent years due to their exceptionally high theoretical energy density. If even 15% of this energy density is achieved, then it would equal the value of gasoline, making lithium-oxygen batteries with driving ranges of up to 500 miles per charge commercially viable. While this technology is very attractive, numerous technical challenges need to be overcome before its widespread adoption is possible. Some of these challenges include: (i) insolubility of the solid discharge reaction products, leading to clogging of the cathode and eventually resulting battery cell death; (ii) low roundtrip (discharge-charge cycle) efficiency due to high charge overpotentials to dissociate the main discharge reaction product, lithium peroxide; and (iii) instability of electrolytes at high overpotentials. This research project seeks to alleviate these issues by designing solid-solid interfaces at the cathode of lithium-oxygen batteries that selectively stabilize lithium-deficient discharge products that are not insulating and can be dissociated at reasonable overpotentials. The researchers will apply a combined experimental and theoretical approach to study the chemistry at these solid-solid interfaces with the aim of designing materials that can selectivity tune the discharge product distribution such that it leads to improved battery performance. In particular, the work will involve a combination of advanced characterization studies and theoretical calculations to determine how the elemental composition, electronic properties, and symmetry of the oxide surface influence the discharge product distribution in lithium-oxygen cathodes. The studies will elucidate the effect of the global oxide crystal structure on the discharge product formation and lead to the development of design principles for identifying oxide electrocatalysts that are highly selective towards the formation of lithium-deficient oxide discharge products and therefore exhibit low charge overpotentials.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Collaborative Research: Engineering the Chemistry at Solid-Solid Interfaces of Li-O2 Battery Cathodes: Wayne State University

Eranda Nikolla

[email protected]

Lithium-oxygen batteries potentially could have energy storage capacities that rival gasoline fuel, but there remains much fundamental scientific knowledge to learn about these batteries before the technology can be commercialized. In particular, some of the chemical products formed during the operation of the batteries can slowly degrade and poison the materials, leading to performance losses over extended periods of operation. This research project seeks to overcome these problems by exploring a class of inexpensive, mixed metal oxide electrocatalysts that may alter the chemistry of lithium-oxygen batteries. This project aims to develop a framework to engineer the chemistry of lithium-oxygen batteries, which are a potential next-generation energy storage device, and to improve their performance. The studies combine advanced characterization methods and theoretical calculations to determine how the properties of the oxide surfaces influence the products that are produced on lithium-oxygen electrodes. These insights will be leveraged to develop design principles that will aide in identifying oxide electrocatalysts that improve battery cell performance. The researchers involved in this project will partner with local K-12 schools to involve economically disadvantaged students with the proposed research through summer internships and student exchanges. They aim to inspire the students to pursue careers in science and engineering. <br/><br/>A fundamental understanding of the reactions occurring at solid-solid interfaces is critical for the development of next-generation energy storage devices, such as lithium-oxygen batteries. Lithium-oxygen batteries have attracted significant interest in recent years due to their exceptionally high theoretical energy density. If even 15% of this energy density is achieved, then it would equal the value of gasoline, making lithium-oxygen batteries with driving ranges of up to 500 miles per charge commercially viable. While this technology is very attractive, numerous technical challenges need to be overcome before its widespread adoption is possible. Some of these challenges include: (i) insolubility of the solid discharge reaction products, leading to clogging of the cathode and eventually resulting battery cell death; (ii) low roundtrip (discharge-charge cycle) efficiency due to high charge overpotentials to dissociate the main discharge reaction product, lithium peroxide; and (iii) instability of electrolytes at high overpotentials. This research project seeks to alleviate these issues by designing solid-solid interfaces at the cathode of lithium-oxygen batteries that selectively stabilize lithium-deficient discharge products that are not insulating and can be dissociated at reasonable overpotentials. The researchers will apply a combined experimental and theoretical approach to study the chemistry at these solid-solid interfaces with the aim of designing materials that can selectivity tune the discharge product distribution such that it leads to improved battery performance. In particular, the work will involve a combination of advanced characterization studies and theoretical calculations to determine how the elemental composition, electronic properties, and symmetry of the oxide surface influence the discharge product distribution in lithium-oxygen cathodes. The studies will elucidate the effect of the global oxide crystal structure on the discharge product formation and lead to the development of design principles for identifying oxide electrocatalysts that are highly selective towards the formation of lithium-deficient oxide discharge products and therefore exhibit low charge overpotentials.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Engagement, Achievement, and Graduation of Undergraduate Students: A Partnership in STEM Education: Portland State University

Gwynn Johnson

[email protected]

This project will contribute to the national need for well-educated scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and technicians by supporting the retention and graduation of high-achieving, low-income students with demonstrated financial need at Portland State University and Heritage University. Portland State University is a four-year urban institution; Heritage University is a two-year, rural, minority-serving institution located on the Yakama Reservation in Washington State. Over its five-year duration, this project will bridge the urban-rural divide by awarding two-year or four-year scholarships to at least 116 students who are pursuing associate's or bachelor's degrees in STEM fields, including environmental sciences and engineering. The project is centered on the organizing theme of environmental pollution in the Columbia River Basin and the Pacific Northwest. Scholarships will be provided to high-achieving STEM students, enabling them to participate in research and service-learning projects that address authentic regional issues, focus on community-based challenges, and strengthen community connections. The project will create new STEM career pathways for Heritage University students by building a seamless transition into undergraduate STEM programs at Portland State University. Project outcomes include increased STEM retention and graduation rates of Scholars at both institutions. As a result, the project has the potential to broaden participation of traditionally underrepresented groups in the local and regional STEM workforce.<br/><br/>The overall goal of this project is to increase STEM degree completion of low-income, high-achieving undergraduates with demonstrated financial need. Through recruitment at local high schools and community colleges, outreach across both campuses, the use of promotional materials and social media postings, a broad group of Scholars will be recruited. The project will focus on increasing enrollment, retention, and graduation in STEM majors by developing the student's sense of science identity in environmental sciences and engineering. A research study will be conducted to advance understanding of correlative relationships between the many beneficial elements of the project, such as deliberative pedagogy, research experiences, student sense of community, science identity, and research self-efficacy. An experienced, independent external evaluator, who is an educational psychologist, will conduct formative and summative evaluation of the project. This project is funded by NSF's Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics program, which seeks to increase the number of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need who earn degrees in STEM fields. It also aims to improve the education of future STEM workers, and to generate knowledge about academic success, retention, transfer, graduation, and academic/career pathways of low-income students.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Fate of Cadmium and Arsenic Under Engineered Physico-Chemical Gradients in the Soil-Water-Rice Nexus: University of Delaware

Angelia Seyfferth

[email protected]

Rice is a staple food for half the world's population. Despite its importance, the yield and quality of rice are threatened by arsenic and cadmium uptake from soil. Rice will uptake and concentrate arsenic when it is grown under conventional soil flooding, because arsenic is released into the water from biogeochemical reactions in the soil. This process can happen even when soil arsenic concentrations are low. Although minimizing soil flooding can decrease arsenic contamination of rice and even save water resources, doing so can increase rice grain uptake of cadmium from the soil. The goal of this research project is to develop methods that simultaneously limit rice uptake of both arsenic and cadmium. Manganese(II) is less toxic to plants than cadmium or arsenic and has been recently shown to share a root transport pathway with cadmium. Therefore, it should be possible to exploit the geochemical characteristics of manganese to decrease uptake of cadmium into the plant via engineered soil electrochemistry. This research project takes a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates geochemistry and plant biology methods and also will utilize resources at the NSF-funded Rice Investigation, Communication, and Education (RICE) Facility. This work will help train and foster the professional development of the next generation of STEM professionals to tackle the grand challenge of a sustainable food supply. Additional outreach efforts to high schools will increase scientific literacy of students and hopefully interest them in STEM careers.<br/><br/>Rice is often the first food consumed by infants and is also a staple food for half of the global population. However, the yield and quality of rice are threatened by the uptake of toxic arsenic and cadmium during the soil flooding process integral to rice cultivation. Although arsenic cycling has been well studied over the last two decades, cadmium cycling and uptake by rice is less well understood. The hypothesis behind this research project is that controlling manganese(II) availability can provide an engineered solution to limit cadmium and arsenic uptake by rice. The specific objectives of this project are 1) to understand the role of increasing manganese(II) availability in decreasing cadmium uptake by rice in simple hydroponic systems; 2) to evaluate the impact of engineered redox states on dissolution, plant uptake, and localization of metal(loid)s including manganese, iron, cadmium, and arsenic, in rice plants grown in rice paddy mesocosms; and 3) to compare traditional redox measurements to novel techniques for quantifying indicators of reduction in soil (IRIS) films. IRIS film technology will be evaluated as a low-cost means for farmers to know when to drain their fields in order to restrict rice uptake of toxic metalloids. The outcomes of this research will transform the ability of rice agronomists, wetland scientists, farmers, and other stakeholders to prevent toxic metal uptake and thereby safeguard the food supply of billions of people. The results of this study should be applicable to many other plants beyond rice, because many plants also accumulate cadmium.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

CAREER: New Probes of Heterogeneity in Next-Generation Nanocrystal Emitters: University of California-Los Angeles

Justin Caram

[email protected]

Professor Justin R. Caram of the University of California-Los Angeles is supported by the Macromolecular, Supramolecular, and Nanochemistry (MSN) Program and the Chemical Structure, Dynamics, and Mechanisms-A (CSDM-A) Program of the Division of Chemistry to develop new spectroscopic measurement methods to study the emission of short-wave infrared light from quantum dots. The quantum dots are incredibly small, man-made nanocrystals with diameters about 10,000 times narrower than a human hair. The research seeks to overcome the current limitations on instrumentation and methods at the single nanocrystal level. This goal is important because the nanocrystals come as an non-uniform mix of particles with different sizes, shapes and structures. This mixture complicates their study and hinders their use in optoelectronic devices. The knowledge obtained on single crystals may open the way for the systematic formation of uniform quantum dot materials with decreased toxicity and new functionality in the short-wave infrared — a spectral region beyond where human eyes can see. Success in conducting the research may widens the use of quantum dots in biomedical imaging, next-generation optoelectronic devices, optical communications, and solar energy conversion. During the course of this research, Professor Caram is revamping general chemistry courses through the development of learning laboratories that incorporate new pedagogical technologies to help students develop skills and motivation to continue their schooling in STEM majors after their first year in college. <br/> <br/>In this project, Professor Caram and his research team are supported to develop spectroscopic techniques to probe the intrinsic photo properties of short-wave infrared emitting (SWIR) colloidal nanocrystals, including HgX and CuInS2. The statistical variations from nanocrystal to nanocrystal and the average and distribution of exciton and mutilexciton lifetimes, yields and spectra of these nanoparticles in solution are assessed. SWIR photon-counting and correlation is achieved using recently developed spectroscopic tools. The project combines new infrared active detectors suitable for efficient photon counting, timing and correlation in shortwave infrared; path-length Mach-Zehnder interferometry to attain simultaneous temporal and spectral resolution, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to probe emitters as they diffuse through a focal volume in dilute solution. The research starts with a focus on HgX (X=S, Se, Te) quantum confined nanocrystals, which exhibit tunable bandgaps from 0 to 1.6 eV and have a wide range of applications in lasing, quantum communications, and infrared sensing. The focus shifts to the toxic cadmium-free nanostructure (CuInS2), which displays complex ensemble photoluminescence, including trap/defect emission, electrochemical doping and non-stoichiometry. The method employed resolves and correlates the energies of emitted photons as a function of inter-photon spacing, creating a two-dimensional map of emitter stream from dilute ensemble, in analogy to two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Signatures of peculiar velocities in the cosmic microwave background: University of Southern California

Elena Pierpaoli

[email protected]

The statistics of the peculiar velocity field of galaxy clusters (i.e., motions not related to expansion of the universe) are highly informative about the nature of dark matter, dark energy, and the theory of gravity. Currently, peculiar velocity measurements on large scales are limited to only the line-of-sight components of clusters, leaving most of the available information in the velocity field inaccessible to us. The yet-undetected transverse components can be traced through the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via two effects: (i) the Birkinshaw-Gull (BG) effect in CMB temperature, and (ii) the Kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldocivh (kSZ) effect in CMB polarization. In this research, we make a realistic assessment of the detectability of these signals with the near future CMB experiments, and also investigate the possibility of exploiting the statistics of these signals for cosmology. The PI will develop a creative educational product for K-12 students to promote awareness of and interest in physics and cosmology, in particular the physics of galaxy clusters and structure formation. K-12 teachers will be trained to use this educational product leveraging on existing relationships via the USC family of schools. The developed material will also be available online for all educators willing to download and use it.<br/> <br/>The amplitude of both BG and kSZ effects are subdominant with respect to the primary CMB anisotropies and current instrumental noise levels. Aside from this, the signals can be confused with other emissions from within and outside the clusters, gravitational lensing effects, and uncertainties in clusters' physical description. Therefore, it is almost impossible to observe these effects for individual objects. Nevertheless, it is still possible to achieve a successful detection of them by employing novel statistical methods in the analysis of data. One example is to use pairwise statistical estimators which have been shown to significantly increase the detection signal-to-noise ratio. Throughout this project we will investigate the possibility of measuring these signals in the near future using the next generation of CMB surveys. We will provide forecast analyses through semi-analytical and numerical simulations of clusters and introduce proper map-filtering techniques and new statistical tools for this purpose. The current general interest in producing larger and deeper CMB surveys with improved intensity and polarization sensitivities makes this an appropriate time to further the study of peculiar velocities and inspect their cosmological implications.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

CAREER: The role of seasonal migration in avian diversification: Colorado State University

Kristen Ruegg

[email protected]

The goal of this project is to explore the role of natural selection on the wintering grounds of seasonal migratory birds in maintaining or opposing adaptive divergence. The project takes advantage of the wealth of information available for one of the most widely studied groups of animals. Additionally, the work will provide important information across all habitats for use in conservation of Neotropical migratory birds, over half of which are declining, by predicting the capacity of seasonal migratory animals to adapt to rapid environmental change. The project includes a 3-part plan to improve STEM education for underrepresented minority groups at the local, national, and international level: 1) Bird Camp ? a multi-day educational outreach program targeting low-income schools in Fort Collins, Colorado; 2) Birds without Borders ? a series of Spanish language (with English subtitles) videos that highlight the work of Latin American and female scientists developed with nature documentary film makers; and 3) Mexico Bioinformatics Workshop ? an international genomic sequencing and bioinformatics workshop in collaboration with US and Mexican scientists. <br/><br/>Theoretical models have long supported the idea that strong migratory connections across the annual cycle will promote local adaptation to wintering areas, but empirical research to support this hypothesis is unexplored. This knowledge gap resulted from technological hurdles related to the inability to track migratory movements and assess patterns of adaptive divergence across the genome. The goal of the proposed work is to take advantage of recent advances in tracking technology and genomic sequencing to test theoretical predictions regarding the role of previously unexplored events on the wintering grounds in the process of adaptive evolution. The proposed work will leverage and synthesize population genomic and migratory movement data for 11 species of migratory birds to provide the first empirical test of the hypothesis that strong migratory connections across the annual cycle promote local adaptation to wintering areas. Genetic estimates of gene flow across time and space will be combined with habitat modeling to answer basic questions about the role of ecology and phenology in the process of adaptive divergence in seasonal migratory birds. The integration of ecological, molecular, and statistical approaches across a range of species will allow fundamental evolutionary questions to be addressed.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Observing LIGO/Virgo-triggered neutron star mergers with the Dark Energy Camera: a new path for Cosmology: Brandeis University

Marcelle Soares-Santos

[email protected]

This project will make a precision measurement of the cosmic expansion rate. This hybrid program has a target of opportunity follow-up component and a survey component. The survey will strategically cover the regions of interest of many black hole events. It will collect a sample of gravitational-wave triggered neutron star merger events and a sample of black hole mergers for which potential host galaxies have been cataloged. The rate of cosmic expansion is a key parameter in modern cosmology. There is currently tension between local measurements and the results from cosmic microwave background studies, which motivates the pursuit of improved independent observables: gravitational waves have long been proposed as one such. This work covers two such alternatives. Broadening the impact of research on society at large requires effective communication to audiences from diverse backgrounds, including pre-college teens currently under-represented in STEM fields. The researcher will engage with high schools and emphasize under-represented groups, using the infrastructure of the Brandeis Science Communication Laboratory.<br/><br/>This study uses the full range of available data from the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on NSF's Blanco 4-meter telescope in Chile, including images taken as part of the Dark Energy Survey (DES), as well as non-DES DECam images. It will also use data from another NSF facility, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, LIGO. Methods to be used include a Hubble diagram fit to a sample of neutron star mergers and a statistical dark sirens analysis for black hole events. This is a new method independent of other cosmological probes, because standard sirens are distance indicators based solely on general relativity. Detectors with enough sensitivity to enable this approach became operational in 2015. This research will fully exploit the novel datasets as multi-messenger probes for cosmology using DES/DECam data, making a measurement of the expansion rate with 3-5% (statistical) uncertainty by 2022, and enabling percent-level precision with future data from facilities like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

CAREER: Light-matter interactions at the single emitter level: Precise control of plasmon-exciton coupling: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Esther Wertz

[email protected]

When light interacts with matter, its properties ? color and energy, for example ? can be drastically modified. New techniques for manipulating light will enable better solutions to some of today?s biggest challenges, from maximizing efficiency in transforming sunlight into electricity to building faster computers. This project aims to control light at the quantum limit?one particle of light (or photon) at a time?using nanometer-scale metal structures. However, many questions remain about how such nanometer-scale structures affect individual photons. Thus, the first goal of this project is to develop new microscopy methods that will permit the study of light-matter interactions near these metal structures with unprecedented resolution. With this newfound understanding, the second goal is to use the nano-particles to construct the first step towards a quantum computer, which promises an explosion of power and speed in the computers of the future. This project also has broad goals to create space for all students to thrive, regardless of gender, race, and socioeconomic background. This will be achieved, in part, by expanding the scope of the Rensselaer Women in Physics group?s outreach activities to the local elementary and middle schools, and by incorporating diversity education into the physics curriculum. <br/><br/>The potential of quantum information science is fueling demand for the design and generation of new qubits and devices, such as transistors, operating at the single-particle level. Localized surface plasmon resonances in metal nano-particles offer the ability to confine the electromagnetic field to scales well below the diffraction limit of light, and promise the possibility of integratable devices operating at the quantum level. In particular, these plasmon resonances can strongly couple with molecular or semiconductor excitons to form new hybridized states. These states can be used to develop single-photon transistors and other building blocks of a functioning quantum circuit. However, several roadblocks have up to now limited plasmons? practical use. Indeed, although plasmonic modes present the advantage of coupling very strongly to matter, the very small mode volume in plasmonic cavities makes it difficult to get good spatial overlap with single emitters such as quantum dots. This research project proposes to design, develop, and characterize new methods for the fundamental investigation and precise control of the coupling between single quantum emitters and plasmonic nano-cavities. The research objectives include: (1) Developing a new tool to experimentally measure the local density of states using single-molecule super-resolution microscopy, and to understand light-matter interactions in the vicinity of plasmonic nano-structures, beyond what can be learned from simulations of the structure design; (2) Achieving reproducible and controllable coupling between individual quantum emitters and a plasmonic nano-cavity using plasmonic optical trapping; (3) Studying the transition from weak to strong coupling regime in real time and using the strongly coupled system to demonstrate single photon blockade.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsFreedom CheteniSchool Administrators ResearchThe Superintendents Journal

Collaborative Research: Workshop on Exuberance of Machine Learning in Transport Phenomena: Carnegie-Mellon University

Amir Barati Farimani

[email protected]

This award is to support the Workshop on Exuberance of Machine Learning in Transport Phenomena to be held on February 10-11, 2020 in Dallas, Texas. The workshop focuses on highlighting the current state-of-the-art and future directions on the application of Machine Learning on transport phenomena research. With the growth of Machine Learning in all areas of science and engineering, we have observed a rapid growth in the number of workshops, conferences, and summer schools all over the world. This workshop is unique in which it brings together national experts from all areas of transport phenomena research to exchange ideas, and to establish a better understanding on limitations and potentials of Machine Learning. <br/><br/>The workshop program includes invited speakers who will offer their expert views of important directions in Machine Learning, transport phenomena, and their intersection. It will also involve panel discussions on related topics, exploring novel ways to advance the field, and to identify gaps across the curriculum for effective training and education of the future generation of scientists and engineers capable of tackling important problems at the intersection of these two subjects. A Final Report will be prepared at the end of the workshop which will include a summary of the workshop and the major recommendations made by the experts in the field.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

1 2 3 299 300
About Exponent

Exponent is a modern business theme, that lets you build stunning high performance websites using a fully visual interface. Start with any of the demos below or build one on your own.

Get Started
Privacy Settings
We use cookies to enhance your experience while using our website. If you are using our Services via a browser you can restrict, block or remove cookies through your web browser settings. We also use content and scripts from third parties that may use tracking technologies. You can selectively provide your consent below to allow such third party embeds. For complete information about the cookies we use, data we collect and how we process them, please check our Privacy Policy
Youtube
Consent to display content from Youtube
Vimeo
Consent to display content from Vimeo
Google Maps
Consent to display content from Google
Spotify
Consent to display content from Spotify
Sound Cloud
Consent to display content from Sound