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I-Corps: Virtual Reality Biofeedback Education Technologies

Award Number: 1938166
Sponsor : Cornell University
Michael Timmons [email protected] (Principal Investigator)

ABSTRACT
The broader impact/commercial potential of this I-Corps project is to provide a new means for how educational content is delivered in virtual reality (VR) with consistent impact, independent of demographics and environment. This technology offers a higher level of personalized learning that can be administered without requiring accompanying professional development for teachers due to the delivery of lessons in a highly controlled virtual environment. Removing this dependence on additional training facilitates the adoption across schools with limited resources. The increased efficacy in learning and retention of material through VR has made it a technology of interest for teachers and school administrators. This technology can be used across a range of educational subjects, and with the immersive personalized learning experience, offers a high-quality learning solution for educators.

This I-Corps project uses biofeedback to personalize learning in virtual reality (VR). The technology manipulates a user’s environment based on their physiological reactions. This can include the surrounding physical objects, light source, or landscape. The auditory manipulation is a more indirect change where the audio path of a lesson is based on the emotional reaction of a user, such as when someone is distracted or agitated. This emotional reaction is based on tracking numerous physiological inputs over time. The identification process is based on existing research using the same physiological measures to classify users’ emotional states and improved through this project This level of adaptation enables a higher degree of VR program customization and more a meaningful learning experience while using the technology.

This award reflects NSF’s statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation’s intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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Urban Massachusetts Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Program: University of Massachusetts Boston

Winston Langley

[email protected]

The Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program assists universities and colleges in their efforts to significantly increase the numbers of students matriculating into and successfully completing high quality degree programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines in order to diversify the STEM workforce. Particular emphasis is placed on transforming undergraduate STEM education through innovative, evidence-based recruitment and retention strategies, and relevant educational experiences in support of racial and ethnic groups historically underrepresented in STEM disciplines: African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders. These strategies facilitate the production of well-prepared students highly-qualified and motivated to pursue graduate education or careers in STEM.<br/><br/>For the United States (U.S.) to remain globally competitive, it is vital that it taps into the talent of all its citizens and provides exceptional educational preparedness in STEM areas that underpin the knowledge-based economy. The Urban Massachusetts Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (UMLSAMP) program was established in 2007 in response to the need for a more diverse and skilled technical workforce. That need still exists and is particularly acute in the Eastern Region of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Participating institutions include three University of Massachusetts campuses (Boston, Dartmouth and Lowell); Wentworth Institute of Technology; and four community college partners (Bristol, Bunker Hill, Middlesex, and Roxbury). The UMLSAMP's goals are to increase the number of 1) Black, Hispanic, and Native American STEM students by 50%; 2) Baccalaureate STEM degrees awarded to Black, Hispanic, and Native American students by 150%; and 3) Students who successfully transfer from Alliance community colleges into BS STEM majors by 150%. These goals support the National Science Foundation's strategic goal to "cultivate a world-class, broadly inclusive science and engineering workforce, and expand the scientific literacy of all citizens." The goals will be accomplished by strategies based on the previous 10 years of Alliance experience to include but are not limited to: Facilitated Study Groups, Supplemental Instruction, Research Skills Development Workshops, Mentored Research Experiences for Undergraduates in STEM, and Community Service Projects.<br/><br/>The knowledge generating research study will employ a multi-layered, mixed-methods design with the supposition that understanding the specific programmatic aspects that contribute to LSAMP's success, institutionalizing these at Alliance institutions, and replicating them across the higher education sector can make a significant contribution to diversifying the nation's STEM-skilled workforce in all fields. Lessons learned and programmatic outcomes will be disseminated through online communication channels, participation in national and international student success and STEM related conferences and workshops, and peer-reviewed publications. Progress towards project goals will be carefully tracked internally in accordance with the UMLSAMP Logical Model and through the engagement of an external evaluator.

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EFRI C3 SoRo: Between a Soft Robot and a Hard Place: Estimation and Control Algorithms that Exploit Soft Robots' Unique Abilities: University of Tulsa

Joshua Schultz

[email protected]

This project will improve the ability to control fabric-reinforced inflatable soft robots. Soft robots offer tremendous promise because they can conform to features in an unknown environment and then change shape to perform tasks, such as entwining objects or squeezing into small gaps. These could be useful in search and rescue, disaster relief, and increasing customization in manufacturing. While scientists and engineers have managed to demonstrate these types of movements by trial and error, getting them to work under computer control has been difficult. Because soft robots are usually made of elastomeric materials, a multitude of sensors can be molded into the robot, measuring touch, proximity, and the shape of objects in the environment. With such a large number of sensors, the robot has access to a rich amount of data that can be used to help determine the current position and shape of the robot. The elastomeric material of soft robots also offers the opportunity to incorporate active materials that can change their properties upon command from a computer. These materials can be used to tune the stiffness of the soft robot or provide additional options for changing its shape. If successful, this research project will produce improved algorithms to process these sensor inputs so that the soft robot can distill them into meaningful information about itself and the world. The techniques will be leveraged to broadly spread the benefits of the research to the wider community. Teams of selected K-12 teachers will participate in a decathlon-style contest, using a single robot to compete in a series of diverse tasks and building their skills with soft robot technology for later use in their classrooms.<br/><br/>The research effort centers around developing concise models for the motions of a fabric-reinforced rubber tube that can be evaluated quickly by a computer. Particular attention will be given to behaviors that are difficult to represent by existing techniques, such as wrinkling, pleating and buckling. Based on the simplified model, the algorithm will postulate a variety of possible shapes for the robot at each instant. The algorithm will then decide which is correct by comparing measurements from its many sensors to the predictions of the model. Using the data gathered by the robot platforms, the robot will be able to learn how to select the appropriate commands — that is, the combinations of pneumatic valve signals and tunable stiffness patches in the rubber walls — to autonomously complete useful tasks where the robot must push on the environment. The algorithm will be validated in representative tasks such as hanging drywall and retrieving objects in clutter.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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CNH2-L: Uncovering Metacoupled Socio-Environmental Systems: Michigan State University

Jianguo Liu

[email protected]

Today's global socio-environmental challenges place unprecedented demands on natural and social sciences to understand and forecast a tightly interconnected world. Yet most studies on socio-environmental interactions have focused on a single socio-environmental system. While some studies have separately examined socio-environmental interactions between adjacent or distant systems, they usually focused on one-way impacts. Although these separate studies have generated useful information, little is known about the relationships among socio-environmental interactions within and across adjacent and distant systems systematically and simultaneously. This award will fill these key knowledge gaps by addressing some of the world's biggest challenges such as land use and food security across scales and across borders. The results are expected to reveal transformational insights into global food production, trade, and labor dynamics. They can also shine light on the potential cascading consequences of land use decisions. This innovative research represents an exciting new frontier, with pioneering contributions to the theory, methods, and applications of socio-environmental systems research. It will be tightly integrated with ambitious education and outreach efforts, elevating the public's understanding of the socioeconomic and environmental effects of complex trade relationships. Students and postdoc will gain broad knowledge and learn important skills to become future visionary leaders and globally engaged scholars.<br/><br/>The interdisciplinary research team will apply and quantify the holistic metacoupling framework that integrates socioeconomic-environmental interactions within as well as between adjacent and distant systems. Fundamental questions include: How do intracouplings (e.g., food production within a coupled system), pericouplings (e.g., labor movement between adjacent systems), and telecouplings (e.g., trade between distant systems) complement, enhance and/or offset their effects on socio-environmental feedbacks? To address this and other questions, the project will leverage existing and new data on global trade of a major agricultural commodity — soybeans — and associated labor and financial flows for commodity production. Analyses at the international/national scales will be conducted with new global grid-based models and other state-of-the-art tools. They will be complemented by in-depth studies at regional/local scales in key soybean exporting and importing countries through population census and agricultural data, ecological fieldwork and face-to-face interviews to inform the development and validation of a novel metacoupled agent-based model. These studies, spanning local to international scales, will be joined via systems integration. The international researchers will understand and simulate complex dynamics and feedbacks of metacoupled systems under various scenarios co-designed with stakeholders.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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Mentored Pathways from Community College to Graduate School and Chemistry Careers: Southwestern College

David Hecht

[email protected]

This project will contribute to the national need for well-educated scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and technicians by supporting the retention and graduation of high-achieving, low-income students with demonstrated financial need. Over five years, this project will fund 120 scholarships to four groups of 30 students who are pursuing associate degrees at Southwestern College, and 45 scholarships for 30 transfer students and 15 graduate students who are pursuing baccalaureate and graduate degrees in chemistry and biochemistry at San Diego State University. This project will create an integrated mentoring and research pathway that bridges the chemistry and biochemistry programs at Southwestern College and San Diego State University. Both Southwestern College and San Diego State University are Hispanic-Serving Institutions. As a result, the project has the potential to improve diversity in STEM graduate programs and careers by identifying and removing roadblocks to student transfer and post-transfer success. Along with financial support, scholars will have opportunities to participate in sustained undergraduate research experiences throughout their academic careers. Additional supports include: mentoring by faculty, graduate students, and peers; opportunities for students to attend and present their research at national and regional professional conferences; and career/graduate school application workshops. Mentors will participate in training on best practices in mentoring to ensure high-quality research experiences for all students. These proposed activities are designed to provide a mentored pathway from community college into graduate school and STEM careers. <br/><br/>The objectives of this project are to: improve student success, retention, and completion of chemistry courses and degrees at Southwestern College and at San Diego State University; facilitate transfer of academically talented, low-income students to San Diego State University as Chemistry/Biochemistry majors; and increase graduate school acceptance rates and/or STEM career placement rates after graduation. Knowledge generation activities will focus on three areas. First, the project will examine how scholarships and participation in program activities affect traditional metrics of student success such as GPA, transfer rates, persistence, loans, time to degree, career plans, and employment after degree. Second, using the lens of social cognitive career theory and measurements of scientific self-efficacy, confidence, scientific identity, and sense of belonging, it will examine how students' affective domain is influenced by program activities. Finally, the mentoring activities themselves will be evaluated to understand the effects of structured mentoring experiences on both mentors and mentees. Dissemination of results through peer-reviewed publications, conference presentations, and outreach will enable other community college-university partnerships to apply lessons learned from this program to enhance student success in other locations. It is expected that the research projects in which students participate will also produce new scientific knowledge in chemistry, including organic chemistry, chemical biology, medicinal chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, physical chemistry, and analytical chemistry. This project is funded by NSF's Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics program, which seeks to increase the number of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need who earn degrees in STEM fields. It also aims to improve the education of future STEM workers, and to generate knowledge about academic success, retention, transfer, graduation, and academic/career pathways of low-income students.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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Mentored Pathways from Community College to Graduate School and Chemistry Careers: San Diego State University Foundation

Regis Komperda

[email protected]

This project will contribute to the national need for well-educated scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and technicians by supporting the retention and graduation of high-achieving, low-income students with demonstrated financial need. Over five years, this project will fund 120 scholarships to four groups of 30 students who are pursuing associate degrees at Southwestern College, and 45 scholarships for 30 transfer students and 15 graduate students who are pursuing baccalaureate and graduate degrees in chemistry and biochemistry at San Diego State University. This project will create an integrated mentoring and research pathway that bridges the chemistry and biochemistry programs at Southwestern College and San Diego State University. Both Southwestern College and San Diego State University are Hispanic-Serving Institutions. As a result, the project has the potential to improve diversity in STEM graduate programs and careers by identifying and removing roadblocks to student transfer and post-transfer success. Along with financial support, scholars will have opportunities to participate in sustained undergraduate research experiences throughout their academic careers. Additional supports include: mentoring by faculty, graduate students, and peers; opportunities for students to attend and present their research at national and regional professional conferences; and career/graduate school application workshops. Mentors will participate in training on best practices in mentoring to ensure high-quality research experiences for all students. These proposed activities are designed to provide a mentored pathway from community college into graduate school and STEM careers. <br/><br/>The objectives of this project are to: improve student success, retention, and completion of chemistry courses and degrees at Southwestern College and at San Diego State University; facilitate transfer of academically talented, low-income students to San Diego State University as Chemistry/Biochemistry majors; and increase graduate school acceptance rates and/or STEM career placement rates after graduation. Knowledge generation activities will focus on three areas. First, the project will examine how scholarships and participation in program activities affect traditional metrics of student success such as GPA, transfer rates, persistence, loans, time to degree, career plans, and employment after degree. Second, using the lens of social cognitive career theory and measurements of scientific self-efficacy, confidence, scientific identity, and sense of belonging, it will examine how students' affective domain is influenced by program activities. Finally, the mentoring activities themselves will be evaluated to understand the effects of structured mentoring experiences on both mentors and mentees. Dissemination of results through peer-reviewed publications, conference presentations, and outreach will enable other community college-university partnerships to apply lessons learned from this program to enhance student success in other locations. It is expected that the research projects in which students participate will also produce new scientific knowledge in chemistry, including organic chemistry, chemical biology, medicinal chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, physical chemistry, and analytical chemistry. This project is funded by NSF's Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics program, which seeks to increase the number of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need who earn degrees in STEM fields. It also aims to improve the education of future STEM workers, and to generate knowledge about academic success, retention, transfer, graduation, and academic/career pathways of low-income students.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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NSF INCLUDES Alliance: Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions: University of Texas at El Paso

Ann Gates

[email protected]

This HRD-1834620 is co-funded by NSF INCLUDES, which focuses on catalyzing the STEM enterprise to collaboratively work for inclusive change. This NSF INCLUDES Alliance is co-funded by the NSF Centers of Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) program, which targets The CREST provides support to enhance the research capabilities of minority serving institutions and promotes the development of new knowledge and an expanded presence of students historically underrepresented in STEM disciplines. This NSF INCLUDES Alliance is co-funded by the NSF Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI) program, which seeks to increase the retention and graduation rates of students pursuing associate or baccalaureate degrees in STEM. <br/> <br/><br/><br/>A nationally recognized alliance established in 2006, the Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (CAHSI) serves as the lead partner and backbone of the CAHSI INCLUDES Alliance for broadening participation of Hispanics in computing. The Alliance aligns with the five characteristics of an INCLUDES Alliance Program for achieving impact and fostering collaboration: vision; partnerships; goals and metrics; leadership and communication; and the potential for expansion, sustainability, and scale. The vision of the Alliance is: By 2030, Hispanics will represent 20% or more of those who earn credentials in computing. Credentials are defined as degrees and certifications that lead to gainful employment and advancement in the field. Its mission is to grow and sustain a networked community committed to recruiting, retaining, and accelerating the progress of Hispanics in computing. The established Alliance partnerships (academia, industry, non-profits, and governmental entities), which share the Alliance's vision and commitment to transformative change, are located in the following regions: Southwest (Arizona, Texas, and New Mexico), West (California), Southeast (Florida and Puerto Rico), and North (Illinois, New Jersey, and New York). Other partnerships are with some of the most impactful Hispanic organizations in the country (Excelencia in Education, Great Minds in STEM, and SACNAS). It is these vested partnerships that have helped position CAHSI onto a national platform that recognizes the Alliance's record for increasing the number of Hispanics who are competitive in the computing workforce and academia. In order to grow as a national alliance, while at the same time maintaining quality services and staying laser-focused on a shared vision, the Alliance goals are to: expand its infrastructure; create 'on-the-ground' regional leads and connectors to keep members engaged; focus on reinforcing activities that address local, regional, and cultural needs; and foster a culture of results-based accountability. The data management and evaluation teams will collect and share three levels of evaluative data as metrics for progress and improvement: institutional and individual student data; alliance and regional data; and comparisons of alliance data to national data. A key component of leadership and communication is the relevant and meaningful interactions within regions, across regions, and nationally. To expand, sustain, and scale, the Alliance leadership will build partnerships at the national level to advance Alliance partners' reach, resources, and impact on Hispanic students and faculty. Building trust and shared vision through regional leadership, fostering collective impact, maintaining effective communication channels, and cultivating a culture of continuous improvement are essential for sustainability.<br/><br/>To accelerate change, CAHSI aims to support institutions committed to advancing Hispanic students in computing; provide on-ramps for other alliances, non-governmental organizations, and partners; and prepare the next generation of CAHSI leaders. By creating distributed on-the-ground support through geographically-distributed regional leadership, Alliance institutions will deeply engage with partners to learn what works well and what can be improved within their specific contexts. Led by a nationally renowned scholar, the CAHSI INCLUDES Alliance research investigation will contribute knowledge on what organizational conditions build capacity to transform development of culturally relevant and engaging educational strategies that support Hispanic students in computing. The investigation will provide valuable insight into institutional and pedagogical mechanisms to better serve Hispanic students in computing disciplines and in other STEM disciplines. Alliance efforts have the potential to scale organizational capacity-building efforts in a wider range of contexts.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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NSF Engineering Education and Centers: Stewarding a Community of Scholars, Leaders, and Innovators: American Society For Engineering Education

Rocio Chavela Guerra

[email protected]

This project will assemble grantees and other relevant stakeholders who are part of the National Science Foundation's Engineering Education and Centers (EEC) division ecosystem to foster collaboration and create communities. EEC generally has 350 active awards at any one time, with grantees – known as Principal Investigators, or PIs – spread across the country at different institutions. Because PIs often work "siloed" from other people involved with EEC-funded activities, there is limited ability to share best practices, collaborate, and learn from mistakes and successes of other PIs. This award supports three Grantee Conferences held for the Engineering Education, Broadening Participation in Engineering and Engineering Workforce Development clusters, two Centers and Networks Cluster Meetings, and three Thematic Meetings on (a) research opportunities for under-participating institutions, (b) the effects of socio-demographic trends on the national engineering workforce, and (c) participation of people with visible and invisible disabilities in engineering education.<br/><br/>In recent years, ASEE has convened special meetings focusing on topics such as increasing participation of ethnic, gender, and sexual minorities in engineering, and transitioning veterans into engineering careers, among others. These thematic meetings have engaged thought leaders and influential stakeholders, informing the broader community about opportunities to advance these areas to further the education of engineering professionals. Meetings such as the ones proposed here are organized specifically to share knowledge and create strong networks between and among PIs, with facilitated communication given face-to-face interaction and collaboration (e.g., 2012 CBET Grantee Conference; CMMI 2012 Grantee Conference, 2014 STEP Grantees Meeting, 2014 ERC Meeting, 2015 CPS PI Meeting). ASEE is uniquely positioned to support and connect the EEC community, leveraging its reach and influence to accelerate innovation, dissemination, and adoption of best practices in engineering research, instruction, and diversity and inclusion. Meetings such as those proposed gather interested parties to engage in purposeful networking opportunities to (a) foster knowledge-sharing; (b) cultivate personal and professional relationships, collaborations, and partnerships; (c) inform participants about state-of-the-art and ongoing efforts in the field, and (d) generate insights and knowledge that inform the broader community about current trends via reports, briefs, articles, and online resources. Digital copies of meeting summary reports will be shared with all meeting attendees, and will be made available on the meeting website and publicized via American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) channels (e.g., First Bell, Connections).

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LSAMP BD: University of South Florida Florida-Georgia Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (FGLSAMP): University of South Florida

Jose Zayas-Castro

[email protected]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau by the year 2020 more than half of the nation's children will come from minority racial and ethnic groups. In response to these changing demographics, a recent report by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has addressed the need to increase the participation of individuals from historically underrepresented groups in science and engineering to help maintain this nation's global leadership in technology and innovation and advance national prosperity. The University of South Florida (USF) will serve as the 2019-2021 Bridge to the Doctorate (BD) institutional site for the NSF Florida-Georgia Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (FGLSAMP). This FGLSAMP BD Project seeks to build upon both FGLSAMP's prior successes and USF's preeminence as a global research university by institutionalizing evidence-based practices in the academic and social integration, comprehensive scholar development, and professionalization in the sciences of graduate students from historically underrepresented groups. The 2019-2021 FGLSAMP BD Activity will facilitate increased intellectual exchange and promote greater diversity and inclusion across all USF STEM departments. The overarching aim of this cohort will be to ensure that 100 percent of FGLSAMP BD fellows complete their STEM PhD within five years after entering their doctoral programs. <br/><br/>Through "lesson learned" from seven prior BD site awards and partnerships with four USF Colleges, the Office of Graduate Studies, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the Florida Education Fund's McKnight Doctoral Fellowship program, USF has been recognized as a national leader in minority STEM graduate education. Measurable objectives for the 2019-2021 USF FGLSAMP BD Activity will include: 1) recruiting twelve (12) LSAMP former participants as fellows by fall 2019 into STEM graduate programs (MS or PhD); 2) providing faculty-mentored research-training for all fellows throughout their two-year NSF fellowship tenure; 3) initiating professional development activities to facilitate competitive Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) applications from BD fellows and FGLSAMP undergraduate scholars within the Alliance; 4) supporting the 100 percent transition of USF FGLSAMP BD fellows into STEM PhD programs through interactions with supportive role model scientists and LSAMP undergraduate scholars; and 5) fostering greater inclusion within STEM graduate departments with new faculty and graduate student mentor training initiatives.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

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CSMP Scholarship Program of Central Connecticut: Central Connecticut State University

Stan Kurkovsky

[email protected]

With funding from the National Science Foundation's Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM) program, the CSMP Scholarship Program of Central Connecticut will provide support to low-income students with demonstrated financial need and academic promise. This support will help students succeed in selected STEM disciplines at Central Connecticut State University (CCSU), Manchester Community College (MCC), and Tunxis Community College (TCC). The project is funding 88 scholarships over five years for students pursuing bachelor's degrees in Computer Science, Mathematics, and Physics (CSMP). This scholarship program supports students planning to continue their studies in a graduate program as well as to those planning to enter the workforce upon earning an undergraduate degree. This project implements co-curricular activities proven to improve student persistence and will study the effects on student success of these activities and other factors. The scholarship program will complement and enhance the newly created Transfer Articulation Program (TAP), enabling seamless transfer of students with two-year degrees from community colleges to four-year institutions in the state of Connecticut. The scholarship program will target prospective students recruited through public schools, two-year colleges, and community organizations, as well as promising students already enrolled in CSMP and related programs at CCSU. Faculty serving as mentors will proactively provide interventions for students who experience academic or social/emotional difficulties while in the program. This program builds upon the success of the previous two NSF S-STEM awards that established a well-functioning student support infrastructure and faculty and staff who have experience with these types of interventions. The current program structure incorporates and builds on lessons learned from the prior work. This project will support the study, implementation, and evaluation of co-curricular activities leading to improved academic success of low-income academically talented students.<br/><br/>This S-STEM Track 3 project seeks to improve educational opportunities for financially needy academically talented students and help them succeed in many STEM academic areas. CCSU, MCC, and TCC serve an ethnically-diverse population within the greater Hartford area of Connecticut. A student cohort will create a supportive environment for scholars, supporting their academic success, retention, and timely graduation. The importance of the project stems from the membership of CCSU, MCC and TCC in the Connecticut State Colleges and Universities (CSCU) system, which makes the project potentially scalable to the other CCSU institutions across the state. The strategies used by the scholarship program focus on peer and faculty involvement, academic integration and development, goal commitment, social integration, academic performance, and institutional commitment. Students will benefit from previous interdisciplinary curricular enhancements supported by previous NSF funding. In addition, students will have the opportunity to participate in ongoing research projects with an emphasis on interdisciplinary research which has shown correlation with retention.

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