Articles Tagged with

The Superintendent Journal

Home / The Superintendent Journal
AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

GP-IMPACT: Geosciences Streamlined Pipeline And Research for Community Colleges (Geo-SPARCC): Mississippi State University

Renee Clary

[email protected]

Increased participation in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) is an area of national concern, especially as enrollment in STEM disciplines and development of the STEM workforce is not keeping pace with the need. This is particularly true in the geosciences where the lack of diversity compounds the problem. This Geosciences Streamlined Pipeline And Research for Community Colleges (Geo-SPARCC) at Mississippi State University (MSU) fills a gap in the awareness of and education in the geosciences through collaboration with the State's community colleges. Mississippi is a rural state with a strong community college system, enrolling greater than 75,000 students, ~42% from underrepresented groups (majority African American). Mississippi State University collaborates with Jones County Junior College to develop engaging online versions of introductory geology courses, which will be available to all community college students through Mississippi's Virtual Community College Consortium. The Geo-SPARCC project also develops an e-mentoring network to recruit community college students to consider geosciences degrees and careers, and facilitate their transfer into a 4-year university. The MS Virtual Community College Consortium fosters sustainability of Geo-SPARCC and has the potential to help significantly increase the number of underserved and underrepresented populations in the geosciences.<br/><br/>The Geosciences Streamlined Pipeline And Research for Community Colleges (Geo-SPARCC) project proposes a collaboration between Mississippi State University (MSU) and Mississippi's community colleges (CCs) to develop a pathway from 2 year to 4 year institutions via online instruction and e-mentoring. Geo-SPARCC will 1) interest/recruit CC students in geosciences through engaging online physical/historical geology courses; 2) provide individualized research and field opportunities within online courses; and 3) develop an e-mentoring/social media program between MSU Geosciences faculty/graduate students and CC students. Jones County Junior College (JCJC), the lead CC on the Geo-SPARCC project, will make Geo-SPARCC's online geology courses available through the Mississippi Virtual Community College (MSVCC), providing access for students at all 15 Mississippi CCs as well as MS high school students in dual enrollment courses. The Geo-SPARCC online courses will include personalized research/field components where students conduct independent research and geocaching, and opportunities to participate in MSU Geosciences-led field excursions. Career video vignettes included in the online course design will introduce students to geosciences employment opportunities. Geo-SPARCC further provides CC students with directed individual study research opportunities that can culminate in student presentations at the Mississippi Academy of Science annual conference. Sustainability is ensured since the Geo-SPARCC online courses will be offered in perpetuity by JCJC through the MSVCC, with MSU collaborating with JCJC beyond the Geo-SPARCC project to provide credentialed adjunct instructors to teach the online courses.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

Inspire and Prepare Noyce Scholars to Teach in Rural Environments: St. John Fisher College

Kermin Martinez-Hernandez

[email protected]

With support from the NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, this Track 1 Scholarships and Stipends project aims to serve the national interest in high-quality STEM teaching. It will do so by focusing on two national challenges in STEM education: (i) the shortage of highly qualified STEM teachers, particularly in rural high-need schools; and (ii) the lack of prepared college-ready secondary students in STEM. The project is a collaboration between St. John Fisher College (SJFC), Finger Lakes Community College (FLCC) and four rural high-need local central school districts (Sodus, Geneva, North Rose-Wolcott, and Penn Yan). Through this partnership, the project aims to prepare twenty new STEM teachers over five years. These teachers will be recruited from undergraduate majors in biology, chemistry, mathematics physics, and computer science. The undergraduates will be provided with two-year scholarships to cover their unmet financial needs. Project activities in collaboration with FLCC include early exposure of undergraduates to teaching as a career, and inclusion of FLCC transfer students in pre-service teaching activities. This innovative project plans to supplement curricular requirements with educational modules on Culturally Aware Mentorship (adopted from the University of Wisconsin-Madison), to develop lessons and laboratories that require minimal resources, to educate preservice teachers about trauma-sensitive classrooms, and to increase understanding of poverty's effects on learning environments. Mentoring of Scholars and teachers will also be included. By promoting an educational partnership among local rural school districts, FLCC, and SJFC, this project aims to provide a replicable model of preparation of STEM teachers for high needs, rural school districts across the Nation.<br/><br/>The project aims to accomplish three objectives that address the national need for highly qualified STEM teachers: 1. Recruit twenty STEM undergraduate students, including transfer students from community colleges, to teach in rural environments and support them as they earn the credentials to become mathematics or science teachers; 2. Provide these Noyce Scholars with scholarships and an integrated enrichment and support program to equip them with the knowledge, skills, and disposition to teach effectively in high-need school districts; and 3. Create new knowledge through a research study measuring how introduction of trauma-sensitive pedagogy affects future STEM teachers and their classroom practices. The project aims to support new teachers through ongoing mentoring, professional development, and networking activities, including the development of a community of practice focused on creating trauma-sensitive school communities. Results will be widely shared through such means as publications, professional meetings, and conference presentations. Preparing highly capable STEM teachers trained in creating trauma-sensitive classrooms has the potential to improve educational outcomes as well as college readiness for students in high-needs and rural school districts, informing practices across the STEM community. The Noyce program supports talented STEM undergraduate majors and professionals to become effective K-12 STEM teachers in high-need school districts and experienced, exemplary K-12 STEM teachers to become STEM master teachers. It also supports research on the persistence, retention, and effectiveness of K-12 teachers in high-need school districts.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

CDS&E: Data-Driven Modeling and Analyses of Extreme Waves: University of Maryland College Park

Balakumar Balachandran

[email protected]

Rogue (freak) waves are rare events but they pose one of the greatest maritime risks. This Computational and Data-Enabled Science and Engineering (CDS&E) award would be used to develop a unified, data-driven framework and tools to advance the analysis and prediction of oceanic freak waves. The results of the research would provide key information for risk-based design of civil engineering and marine systems such as offshore platforms, wind turbines, and ships. The framework and tools would also benefit fundamental research on other complex systems that generate large amounts of data that must be processed– ranging from manufacturing processes to disaster planning and response. The researchers' work on identifying signatures of rare events within big data sets could advance fundamental research in a variety of areas from medical diagnostics to airport security and the development of advanced materials. Collaborations with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the US Navy will help to ensure that the work will be used to enhance weather forecasting and safety on the seas. The new framework is to be incorporated into a software package, which is used by NOAA, and is to be made available to researchers, students, and the public. Students will participate in the research and the results will be integrated into course materials and outreach activities for students in the University of Maryland, the US Naval Academy, and Women in Engineering. The researchers will also provide art-in-science displays on extreme wave phenomena for K-12 students. <br/> <br/>This research will be used to integrate statistical learning, signal processing, and Koopman operator theory to develop software tools and processes that can be configured to identify energy localizations across a variety of domains–including ocean waves– to provide a prediction capability. As rare events, there are few measurements of rogue waves but there is a wealth of information on storms, other atmospheric events and wave behavior. An interdisciplinary team will integrate existing NOAA databases, General-Purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) computing, and the application of machine learning. The investigators will advance our understanding of how to use parallel processing of large-scale computations done by combining the processing power of GPUs and Central Processing Units (CPUs). This enhanced understanding will advance fundamental research in dynamical systems by enabling more effective use of a suite of simulation and signal processing tools, such as wavelets, Fast Fourier Transforms, and Monte Carlo simulations.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

CAREER: Elucidating Fundamental Structure-Property Relationships in Ionomer Nanomcomposites for Redox Flow Batteries: Clemson University

Eric Davis

[email protected]

NON-TECHNICAL SUMMARY<br/><br/>The research goal of this CAREER award is to develop novel nanocomposite materials with functionality that can overcome practical hurdles for large-scale energy storage technologies such as the redox flow battery. Inadequate ion selectivity in existing charged polymers utilized in redox flow batteries has motivated the incorporation of nanoparticles, a versatile approach for tuning a wide range of properties of polymers. However, the molecular-scale heterogeneity in these materials has confused structure-property relationships needed for the development of viable nanocomposite materials for flow batteries. To address this gap, the research component of this CAREER award focuses on advancing our understanding of fundamental polymer physics governing interactions between functionalized nanoparticles and charged polymers, and how these in turn alter resultant polymer architectures and bulk functional properties that are relevant for selective ion exchange. The design and synthesis of novel soft composite materials will be guided by these fundamental structure-property relationships to yield desirable molecular-scale interactions, thus enabling their functionality for energy storage applications. These findings and materials also have the potential to impact other critical modern technologies that utilize functional polymer membranes, such as water purification and energy delivery. <br/><br/>These research efforts are closely tied to educational initiatives that aim to engage and inspire the next generation of engineers and scientists. Undergraduate and graduate students contributing to this project will be exposed to advanced materials synthesis and characterization techniques, equipping them with the interdisciplinary skills needed to address tomorrow's engineering challenges. Together with chemical engineering students at Clemson University, this award will develop and implement a STEM-based afterschool program, for students grades 6-8, that emphasizes scientific problem solving through the application of polymer science concepts to tackle hands-on tasks inspired by real-world challenges. Together with the research component, these educational and outreach programs seek to foster an inclusive approach to addressing STEM challenges that improves national technical and economic competencies, as well as helps to build a diverse, competitive, and innovative future workforce.<br/><br/><br/><br/>TECHNICAL SUMMARY<br/><br/>The design of next-generation ionomer nanocomposites for redox flow batteries, a scalable energy storage technology, is hindered by an inadequate understanding of the underlying polymer physics governing ion transport in these charged materials. The complex morphology of existing materials exacerbates this by further confusing fundamental structure-property relationships, resulting in, to date, only marginal improvements in membrane performance. The research goal of this CAREER award is centered on addressing this fundamental knowledge gap by interrogating how polymer network structure and segmental dynamics impact technology-relevant performance properties of ionomer nanocomposites. This will be achieved by systematically varying the molecular weight, monomer architecture, and degree of sulfonation of a series of novel ion-conducting aromatic polymer composites (e.g., sulfonated poly(aryl ether ketone)s) containing functionalized nanoparticles. By tuning the molecular-level properties of the membrane, as well as the characteristics of the nanoparticles (e.g., surface functionalization, size, and loading), the role of morphology on membrane dynamics and ion transport can be elucidated. Segmental dynamics (localized motions and chain dynamics) of the hydrated composite membranes will be interrogated using both neutron spin echo and dielectric spectroscopy, where the latter experimental technique will also be used to characterize the motion of charge carriers, that is, water-mediated ion transport. In addition, 'bulk-scale' dynamics of the hydrated membranes will be captured using infrared spectroscopy and compared to the local membrane dynamics. These powerful, noninvasive spectroscopic techniques can be used to interrogate membrane dynamics over a wide range of length and time scales, providing insight into the impact of nanoparticle characteristics on the collective membrane segmental dynamics and ion diffusion. Performing such studies is critical to establishing comprehensive, fundamental relationships between nanoscale features of the ionomer nanocomposites and device-relevant performance properties. Poroelastic relaxation indentation will be employed to characterize the mechanical properties and the dynamics of solvent migration of the hydrated nanocomposite membranes, as these directly impact water-mediated ion transport in these materials. As the use of advanced functional polymers in membrane-based technologies continues to grow, the fundamental knowledge gained from this research has the potential to impact the design of new materials in areas such as water purification and energy storage and delivery. The research component of this CAREER award is closely integrated with educational initiatives that seek to improve diversity and inclusivity for STEM in the upstate South Carolina area through teaching, undergraduate research, outreach, and the implementation of a STEM-based afterschool program at a local middle school.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

Collaborative Research: Mass Extinction Ecological Response and Recovery in the Cretaceous/Paleogene Gulf Coastal Plain: San Jose State University Foundation

Carlie Pietsch

[email protected]

It is largely unknown how marine animals today will respond to current and future environmental change. This research is using the geologic record of a mass extinction event 66 million years ago as a natural laboratory to understand habitat loss and species survival during rapid environmental changes. The systematically collected paleo-environment and fossil data are the foundation of immersive, online 'Virtual Field Experiences' that engage students with the field collection and lab processing methods of Earth Sciences research. Online experiences and lesson plans aligned with Next Generation Science Standards are broadly available through well-known online portals and disseminated to teachers in the Gulf Coast states.<br/><br/>Periods of extreme, rapid environmental change in Earth history are informative for predicting current and future survivorship in response to changing climate. These events also provide the opportunity to test hypotheses on macroevolutionary pattern and process. This project involves compiling species occurrences and paleoenvironments across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction (~66 Ma) in the U.S. Gulf Coastal Plain. Topics of investigation include (1) the impact of available suitable habitat and habitat continuity on extinction potential; (2) the impact of extreme environmental change on patterns of niche stability within species, and phylogenetic niche conservation within clades; and (3) the influence of extreme environmental change on macroecological shifts in body size and physiological flexibility. This research supports three female early-career PIs, and graduate and undergraduate students at five institutions (two of which serve non-traditional, minority-majority student populations) are trained in field, laboratory, and analytical Earth Science. Two Virtual Field Experiences with high school-level lesson plans will emphasize hypothesis testing and the significance of extinction events.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

Phase I IUCRC at Maryland: Advanced Mammalian Biomanufacturing Innovation Center (AMBIC): University of Maryland College Park

William Bentley

[email protected]

Biopharmaceuticals, such as insulin or cancer-targeting antibodies, are life-saving medicines that are 'bio'manufactured from biological sources, including genetically-modified living cells. Importantly, these complex molecules cannot be manufactured by automated synthetic chemical processes. Instead, they can be biomanufactured by cells optimally grown in bioreactors. The Advanced Mammalian Biomanufacturing Innovation Center (AMBIC) is developing enabling technologies, knowledge, design tools and methods that fast-track advances in biomanufacturing. AMBIC is an industry-led consortium of companies, academic institutions, and federal agencies that is addressing biomanufacturing-related challenges by injecting solutions that enhance speed, reliability, predictability, and product quality (including safety and efficacy), while maintaining flexibility and potentially lowering cost. There are three main research thrusts within AMBIC: (i) understanding industrially-relevant biology so that manufacturing practices can leverage this emerging knowledge to control biological processes for optimal biopharmaceuticals production, (ii) advanced process monitoring and control systems that enable streamlined and effective manufacturing operations, and (iii) creating consensus industry-wide best practices and standards to most effectively utilize manufacturing inputs so that products will readily pass regulatory inspection and review. In this way, the health and security of the US are positively impacted.<br/><br/> As AMBIC investigators develop new and enhanced production processes, cell lines, cell growth media, and process analytical technologies, a state-of-the-art bioprocessing suite within the University of Maryland (UMD) Site and joint with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will be used as a recognized testbed. AMBIC researchers will also work with Maryland's Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (M-CERSI), a regulatory science research center joint with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Scores of biopharmaceuticals companies have biotherapeutics products that are regulated by the FDA and rely on standards and measurements enabled by NIST. The UMD Site helps to integrate these federal agencies into the AMBIC center. The UMD Site will also bring powerful new analytical methodologies including wireless real time process data acquisition and in situ product measurement tools for embedding into advanced reactor control methodologies. Perhaps most importantly, a diverse set of students from a variety of academic backgrounds (chemistry, materials science, chemical and bioengineering, process control) working to advance manufacturing practice will be readily accepted by the industry and will be the catalyst for its future. As AMBIC grows, owing to many participants throughout the US working together to chart the future, it will be a focal point for U.S. biomanufacturing for the next two decades.<br/><br/>This award is co-funded by the following Programs:<br/>Cellular & Biochemical Engineering Program in the Division of Chemical Biochemical Environment and Transport (CBET) – Engineering (ENG) Directorate.<br/>Systems and Synthetic Biology Program in the Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences (MCB) – Biological Sciences Directorate .<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

Functional Nanotubes from Self-Assembled Bis-Urea Macrocycles: University of South Carolina at Columbia

Linda Shimizu

[email protected]

Nature employs self-assembly approaches to control the size and shape of biological structures for performing specific functions. Examples include protein channels and enzymes. A protein channel is formed by a protein that folds into a hollow tubular structure and spans across a membrane to allow passage of small molecules or ions from one side of a membrane to the other side through the channel. An enzyme is a protein that folds into a 3-dimensional structure to create a pocket of specific size and shape for binding and converting target molecules into desired chemical products. Inspired by Nature, Professor Linda Shimizu of the University of South Carolina makes small donut-shaped molecules that assemble in high fidelity into straw like structures called nanotubes. These nanotubes have tiny 1-dimensional channels of less than a nanometer (about 1/1000 times of the width of a strand of hair) in diameter. The Shimizu group conducts research to understand how gases and small molecules are organized and move through these tiny channels. Her research group also uses these nanotubes to restrict how molecules in these channels are oriented with respect to one another, which alters how these trapped guests can react. Fundamental knowledge to be gained from this research could have important implications in separation technologies, flow reactors and the development of new synthetic methods. The broad research approach provides a challenging and interdisciplinary environment to train a diverse group of graduate students as well as provides first research experiences for undergraduates and high school students. In addition, this award supports a chemistry outreach program that broadly promotes public interest in science by bringing chemists into South Carolina K-12 classrooms of high minority enrollment middle schools and high schools. These school visits are intended to showcase the scientific method, highlight cutting edge research, and foster interest in chemistry and in the natural sciences.<br/><br/>Work in Professor Linda Shimizu's laboratory, supported by the Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry Program at the National Science Foundation, utilizes the controlled assembly of bis-urea macrocycles to afford functional tubular assemblies to probe fundamental questions. This research investigates structure-property relationship of macrocycles and linear analogues that contain triphenylamines, benzophenones, and other organic triplet sensitizers. After UV-irradiation, these assemblies form radicals within the walls of the nanotubes. The quantity, persistence and properties of these radicals are related to their structure and organization. In this project, the Shimizu group 1) studies the assemblies to understand the origin of the radical stability; 2) probes diffusion within the nanochannels; 3) evaluates how radicals in the channel walls interact with guests encapsulated within the channels; 4) evaluates the assemblies of triplet sensitizers in oxygenated solutions to determine their efficiency at forming reactive oxygen species; and 5) studies the ability of the nanoreactors to facilitate photooxidations, photocycloadditions and photopolymerization reactions in solution. The knowledge acquired should lead to new predictive tools to determine when persistent radicals will form as well as afford a better understanding of the effects of confinement on reactivity. These results should lead to an increase in structural diversity of organic radicals, which are of interest as molecular magnets, as probes in biological systems, for polarizing agents and as radical initiators for polymerization.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

CAREER: Mechanics of Interfaces in Soft Materials: Syracuse University

Teng Zhang

[email protected]

This Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) project will support fundamental research on the mechanics of interfaces in soft materials by establishing a novel multiscale and multiphysics modeling and simulation platform. Interfaces between soft and hard materials (soft-hard) or soft and soft (soft-soft) materials are ubiquitous in nature and engineering applications, such as tendon on bone for load-bearing, mucus on tongue for prey capture, growing tissues on scaffolds, and bonding silicon on elastomers for stretchable electronics. A fundamental understanding of mechanics of soft material interfaces will help diagnose failures of biological joints and design underwater adhesive patches, flexible electronics, and strong, tough and lightweight composites, which are urgently needed to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare. The integrated education plan includes an interactive teaching module with demonstrations of soap bubbles, kids' stickers and poly dough for outreach programs, participations in summer research intern programs for high school students, and integration of computational tools in the graduate and undergraduate curriculums at Syracuse University. A "Science and Play" outreach program for K-12 students and the general public will be organized in the Manlius Library annually to promote STEM education. Furthermore, the Women in Science and Engineering program at Syracuse University will be leveraged to encourage the participation of students from underrepresented populations.<br/><br/>A major challenge in the mechanics of interfaces in soft materials is that their mechanical behaviors are intrinsically multiscale and multiphysics interactions, which are determined not only by microstructures at interfaces but also the nonlinear strong coupling of surface and bulk deformations. This challenge will be tackled by seamlessly integrating model techniques at different scales in a unified framework with high parallel computation efficiency. Specific tasks include: (1) to bridge coarse-grained models and finite element methods through lattice models and implement the model in the large-scale atomic/molecular massively parallel simulator (LAMMPS), (2) to link deformed configurations of soft-soft interfaces with their molecular structures and nonlinear deformation and surface stress at macroscale levels and study how multiscale couplings govern forces in wet adhesion with large deformation of soft solids, (3) to investigate how macroscale deformation confinement and energy dissipation, mesoscale cavitation, fibrillation and instabilities and microscale molecular and polymer structures synergistically determine the strength and toughness of soft-hard interfaces and derive microstructures informed interfacial force-separation law for soft adhesives.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

Imaging, Manipulation, and Control of Molecular Quantum Systems: University of California-Irvine

Wilson Ho

[email protected]

The ability to visualize, break, and make individual chemical bonds with control and selectivity in space and time would significantly advance modern chemical science. A thorough description of the weak interactions associated with the forces between molecules remains challenging. With support from the Chemical Measurement and Imaging Program in the Division of Chemistry, Professor Wilson Ho and Professor Ruqian Wu at the University of California-Irvine carry out laboratory and computational research that seeks a deeper understanding of chemical interactions within and between molecules on metal surfaces at very low pressures. By taking information gained from experiments using a microscope that can give images of molecules with sub-atom precision ("itProbe") and using it in parallel with computer-aided visualization and simulation methods, Dr. Ho's team is probing the basic interactions between molecules and how those weak interactions are impacted by conditions that typically lead to changes in chemical properties, such as heat and light. Not only is the research area diverse from an expertise point of view, but the project team is dedicated to training of a wide array of researchers from many backgrounds, including undergraduates, with a focus on the recruitment of female and underrepresented students. Outreach activities are organized through the University of California-Irvine, with opportunities to work with Hispanic communities, particularly middle school students in underserved communities in southern California. Results from the research have potential for being shared via educational resources that impact a wide spectrum of users. <br/><br/>The proposed research will provide direct visualization of chemical interactions between atoms and molecules. The integration of experimental measurements and density functional theory calculations for static and dynamic properties enables the visualization, manipulation, and control of the quantum properties in space and time of molecular systems. Such basic understandings open up opportunities for the realization of practical molecular functionalities. Results from the proposed research are of technological importance, including catalysis, energy conversion, environmental management, molecular recognition, and quantum information processing. The proposed research addresses the spatial and temporal evolutions of chemical systems by measuring and imaging time-dependent phenomena. In this way, it becomes possible to visualize, manipulate, and coherently control the molecular properties to implement quantum functionalities. Furthermore, the proposed research manipulates the positions of adsorbed molecules with the microscope to enable the construction of novel nanostructures that are not possible by other means and to provide real-space visualization of the temporal evolution of chemistry.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

AwardsSchool AdministratorsThe Superintendents Journal

A Space Physics PhD (Doctoral Degree) Data Analysis Summer School Program; Kananaskis, Canada; June-July, 2019: University of Iowa

Allison Jaynes

[email protected]

Early career faculty and graduate students from the University of Iowa will attend and participate in the international Canada-Norway Rocket Science Training and Educational Program. This is a PhD summer school focused on data analysis from space-based and ground-based instruments with the aim of uncovering features of scientific significance within the data set. The faculty members will teach part of the course material and gather feedback from the students. They will assess the feasibility of hosting a similar school at the University of Iowa in tandem with the international school.<br/><br/>This award reflects NSF's statutory mission and has been deemed worthy of support through evaluation using the Foundation's intellectual merit and broader impacts review criteria.

1 2 1,214 1,215 1,216 1,217
About Exponent

Exponent is a modern business theme, that lets you build stunning high performance websites using a fully visual interface. Start with any of the demos below or build one on your own.

Get Started
Privacy Settings
We use cookies to enhance your experience while using our website. If you are using our Services via a browser you can restrict, block or remove cookies through your web browser settings. We also use content and scripts from third parties that may use tracking technologies. You can selectively provide your consent below to allow such third party embeds. For complete information about the cookies we use, data we collect and how we process them, please check our Privacy Policy
Youtube
Consent to display content from Youtube
Vimeo
Consent to display content from Vimeo
Google Maps
Consent to display content from Google
Spotify
Consent to display content from Spotify
Sound Cloud
Consent to display content from Sound